Header photo of design by Mariana Fernandez


Class Information

Lecture: Mon/Wed 1 - 1:50pm

Section A04: Friday 1 - 2:20 pm GH 102

TA: Lily Bartenstein

Office: GH 117

Office Hours: Tuesday 9 - 10am, or by appointment

The Text

Charles Mee: http://www.charlesmee.org/big-love.shtml

Inspired by Aeschylus: http://classics.mit.edu/Aeschylus/suppliant.html

Text Analysis Outline

Music: Big Love Playlist

Weekly Assignments

Week 1: Inspiration Images

Week 2: Character Collages

Week 3: 3D Collage

Week 4: A Doll House exercise

Week 5: Scenic Model

Week 6: Costume Sketches

Week 7: Lighting Collage & Sound Descriptions

Week 8: Progress Meetings

Week 9: Collaboration

Week 10: Final Projects

 

Resources for Materials

Blick

Artist and Craftsman Supply

Michaels

Kobey's Swap Meet

 


Artists and Visual Inspiration

In progress - to be compiled in conjunction with the class.

Installation Artists

Sandy Skoglund

sandy-skoglund03.jpg
brokenheart_120x96cm_Inkjetprint_2011.jpg

Gregory Crewsdon -- Also, see the film about making his work (the trailer's here, and it's available on Netflix.)

Land Art / Earthworks

Robert Smithson

Light Artists

James Turrell  -- *Exhibit right now at LACMA



Quotes about Design

The most basic assumption made in this book is that all students training for to be scenographers feel, as an important part of their educational agenda, a strong need to become directly involved in a form of communication that can reveal to others meaningful truths concerning their collective pasts, their current worlds, and their possible futures. Further, all that follows speaks to those students who refuse to limit their fields of inquiry to narrowly defined concepts of those worlds or a theater that reflects only limited views of human possibility. If one accepts Shakespeare’s often quoted but nonetheless still current observation that “all the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players,” the scenographer must also realize that the stage is a real world where the people who inhabit it are no less real than the people who view it. The theater, although a sometimes puzzling and fragmented mirror of the world, is not only a fascinating mechanical toy raised to vast dimensions. On the other hand, the theater is often able to reveal through its mechanical means great subjective truths, truths that would remain essentially unknown or invisible without the theater artist’s ability to manipulate physical form and color. We should never forget that the scenographer must become an expert craftsman who links the world of words and ideas, philosophies and histories, myths and tales, to physical things that can be seen and touched in a world of material form and movement. If there is to be a continuing theater, it must rely on steady flow of craftsmen of revelation.
— Darwin Reid Payne, The Scenographic Imagination